Your Health

WIZENUTRITION

So here’s some Wizeliving FAQ’s about eating. Go grab a tea or coffee, then come back and start reading…..

HOW MANY CALORIES SHOULD I TAKE IN PER DAY?

The recommended calories per day are 2000 Kcals for a woman and 2500 Kcals for a man. FYI, Kcals is shorthand for KiloCalories.

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO SNACK?

Slowly! Ok Ok, not quite. But seriously, when you get the need to nibble. You want to eat something that will burn slowly, that is a fixed size (not a giant bag of chips or candies!), and balanced……slightly higher in protein and packed with some fibre based carbohydrates. The protein and fibre will then help slow down the burn off of the food in your tummy and the carb’s will help get you through to your lunch or dinner.

If you can’t get a fixed size, (because ChewsWize doesn’t deliver to your country yet..!), then get that healthy snack out and pull out a set number of pieces on your desk and agree that’s all you’ll eat for the day. Then put the bag out of sight!

HOW TO BE PORTION WIZE?

When you eat, you should eat not to feel full like a big Chinese New Year Dinner. You want to eat to about 80% of that then stop. This gives your stomach time to catch up to what you’ve been eating and you’ll find it generally is enough for you. Unless you’re a triathlete and then of course keep munching!

SLOW BURNING FOOD VS FAST BURNING FOODS. WHAT IS THIS?

Highly processed foods that are white, such as white rice, white bread, white potato chips and white sugar are not that good for you, as they burn off quickly. These foods are processed by your body super fast, sometimes faster than your body can burn the calories and so your body instead stores that excess calorie in the form of fat, rather than burning it off.

So eating slow burning natural un-processed fibre-full food means the energy is released into your body in a more controlled way and so the energy is less likely to be stored up as that ‘love tire’ around your waist!

WHAT’S A GOOD WAY TO BALANCE MY EATING?

80/20
We believe in a balanced way of living. You can’t always be healthy the entire time you have to live a little. So if you want a glass of wine with dinner or a nice dessert. Then don’t eat quite so much for your main course (or even have a little less carbohydrates..that rice, pasta stuff…), leave some space for that yum cheesecake or spicy shiraz wine.

OUR PACKS

So when we design your packs for the week, we keep the 80/20 concept in mind. So each box is 80% healthy and a nice dose of 20% treats/naughtyness.

WHY IS FIBRE IMPORTANT IN A DIET?

Fibre can help with creating a sense of fullness in your stomach, which helps you eat less. Most doctors recommend that you take in 30-35g of fibre each day. There are two kinds of fibre. Soluble and insoluble. An example of soluble is oats and insoluble would be nuts.

WHAT DOES 35G OF FIBRE LOOK LIKE?

  • Breakfast: Three-quarters of a cup of bran flakes (5g of fiber)
  • Mid-morning snack: A half cup of whole almonds (8g of fiber)
  • Lunch or Dinner: One cup of lentils, split peas or black beans (15-16g of fiber); one cup of broccoli contains 5g of fiber

So mix fibre with your proteins and carbohydrate choices and you’ll be on the right path to a WIZE way of living.

SUGAR, WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL?

Got a sweet tooth? So does one of our founders but you can balance this, you just have to be Wize about what you’re eating. 90grams of sugar is the recommended daily intake with a growing body of evidence suggesting even that amount is too much. So less is more.

It’s often present in more things than you realize. Love those Frappecino’s? It’s in those. What about flavoured coffees? It’s in those too. They’re all sugar syrup based.

Fruit in a can…..yep that also. The list goes on and on.

If you want to learn about a quick list of the typical things that sugar is added to click here. http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eating-tips/sugar-content-20-common-foods

Sugar is wonderful stuff but it is pure energy and we don’t always need that much.

The pure immediate energy release of sugar means you can get a “sugar high”, where you suddenly feel super active, full of ideas and ready to take on anything. But then once you’ve burned through that sugar, you hit the low and you crave that better feeling again and again. It’s not a good cycle to get stuck in.

But, sugar is ok, if it’s in small quantities and balanced with those other slow burning foods. Then it’s not released into the body so quickly.

2+5 CONCEPT. A COOL WAY TO LIVE?

The team at ChewsWize are fans of the GoFor2+5 concept that has been taking off in Australia. It means that you aim for eating 2 portions of fruit and 5 portions of vegetables every day. Here’s what the GoFor2+5 site says:

The Dietary Guidelines for Australians advises the key to eating well is to enjoy a variety of nutritious foods from each of the five food groups. Most Australians eat only about half the recommended quantity of fruit and vegetables. Vegetables, legumes/beans and fruit provide vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and many hundreds of phytonutrients (nutrients naturally present in plants). Most vegetables, legumes/beans and fruit are low in energy (kilojoules) relative to many other foods, and may help ‘fill us up’ to avoid excessive weight gain too.

Dietary patterns high in vegetables, legumes/beans and fruit can help protect us against chronic diseases including heart disease, stroke and some types of cancers. They may also prevent excessive weight gain.

The scientific evidence of the health benefits of eating vegetables and fruit has been reported for decades and continues to strengthen. Different vegetables can help protect the body in different ways, so it’s important to choose a variety of colours, particularly:

  • green (such as broccoli, spinach)
  • orange (such as carrots, pumpkin, sweet potatoes)
  • yellow and red (such as capsicum, tomatoes)

It is also important to include different types of vegetables, for example from the leaves and roots of plants, and legumes such as dried peas, beans, lentils and chickpeas. Fresh, frozen, canned or dried varieties of vegetables and fruit are all suitable foods. Check the ingredients list and choose varieties of canned vegetables without added salt and canned fruit in natural juice, not syrup. For more information about the importance of fruit and vegetables in your diet visit the Eat for Health website.

Go here for more on 2+5. (insert link in green) http://www.gofor2and5.com.au/HealthEating/Why25/tabid/481/Default.aspx

WHAT ARE ANTIOXIDANTS AND WHY ARE THEY GOOD FOR ME?

Essentially they are vitamins, minerals and other nutrients that protect your own cells from the effects of free radicals. Free radicals are molecules that your body produces when it breaks down food for energy or from environmental toxins like cigarette smoke and radiation. Free radicals can damage cells, play a role in heart disease, weaken immune systems and can cause cancer. Antioxidants come in the form of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, beta-carotene, zinc, manganese. Eating a diet high in fruits, whole grains, vegetables that are packed with antioxidants will help keep up a healthy lifestyle.

Here’s a quick list of some foods rich in antioxidants:

Vitamin E: sunflower seeds, almonds, spinach, greens (mustard, turnip), papaya, asparagus, broccoli, carrots, mangoes, pumpkin, bell peppers and nuts.

Vitamin C: kiwi, guava, berries, citrus fruits, peppers, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cantaloupe, cauliflower, honeydew, kale, mangoes, nectarines, papaya, snow peas, sweet potato and tomatoes.

Beta-carotene and other carotenoids: carrots, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, spinach, apricots, asparagus, beets, broccoli, cantaloupe, peppers, kale, mangoes, greens, nectarines, peaches, pink grapefruit, squash, tangerines, tomatoes and watermelon.

Zinc: oysters, wheat germ, sesame seeds, lean red meat, dark chocolate, poultry, beans, nuts and seafood

Selenium: Brazil nuts, sunflower seeds, fish, beef, eggs, poultry, mushrooms, onions and whole grains

Manganese: herbs and spices, wheat germ, nuts, mollusks, seeds, edamame and cocoa powder

Other super antioxidant rich foods: onions, concord grapes, celery, eggplant, tea, apples, red wine, plums, apples, berries and sprouts.

HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP (HFCS) WHY SHOULD I AVOID THE STUFF?

HFCS is most commonly used to sweeten soft drinks and juices. HFCS is a made from the stalks of corn and highly processed in order to make it into a useable sugar. Compared to cane sugar (sucrose), your body processes HFCS quite differently and it’s NOT good.

Regular cane sugar (sucrose) is made from two-sugar molecules bound tightly together-glucose and fructose in equal amounts and requires some digestion by your body.

HFCS is also made from two sugar molecules as in 55% to 45% fructose to glucose ratios. But the molecules are unbound. Since there is no bond between the two molecules, no digestion is required and the two molecules go straight into the blood stream. Fructose heads right to your liver and starts to the production of certain fats that are a major cause of liver damage, such as “fatty liver” syndrome.

The rapidly absorbed glucose triggers big spikes in insulin–our body’s major fat storage hormone. Both these features of HFCS lead to increased metabolic disturbances that drive increases in appetite, weight gain, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, dementia and more.

Learn more here at Dr Hyman’s site who has researched the subject via some highly prominent scientists. http://drhyman.com/blog/2011/05/13/5-reasons-high-fructose-corn-syrup-will-kill-you/#close

ARTIFICIAL COLOURS AND THEIR IMPACTS. (CHEWSWIZE AVOIDS THESE IN A BIG WAY)

This additive (what we call E-numbers) commonly occurring in food has been found to contribute to increased rates of cancer, migraines and also ADHD. In an extensive study by Southampton University in the UK, findings showed primary school children became distracted and failed computer attention tests, amongst many other things.

E-NUMBERS TO WATCH OUT FOR ON THE BACK OF PACKS OF FOOD.

  • Tartrazine (E102)
  • Description: Synthetic yellow dye found in sweets, biscuits, tinned vegetables
  • Products: Disney Winnie the Pooh Cake Kit, Lidl orange jelly, Bacardi Breezer tropical lime.
  • Health effects: causes hyperactivity, linked to allergic reactions and migraines.
  • Quinoline Yellow (E104)
  • Description: Synthetic dye in sweets, pickles, smoked fish
  • Products: Aero orange, Galaxy Minstrels, M&Ms, Bassett’s Sherbet Lemons
  • Health effects: Causes hyperactivity and is linked to rashes. Banned in US.
  • Sunset Yellow (E110)
  • Description: synthetic yellow dye found in sweets, ice cream, fizzy drinks
  • Products: Cadbury Creme Egg, Haribo Jelly Beans, Irn-Bru
  • Health effects: causes hyperactivity and linked to stomach upsets and swelling of skin.
  • Carmoisine (E122)
  • Description: Synthetic red dye found in ready meals, sweets
  • Products: Love Hearts, Galaxy Minstrels, Cadbury Mini Eggs, various lollipops
  • Health effects: causes hyperactivity and is alleged to cause water retention in those allergic to aspirin. Banned in US.
  • Ponceau 4R (E124)
  • Description: synthetic red dye found in sweets, biscuits, drinks
  • Products: Bassett’s Pear Drops, Halls Blackcurrant Soothers, Supercook Alphabet Icing
  • Health effects: causes hyperactivity and is believed to cause problems for asthmatics. Banned in US.
  • Allura red (E129)
  • Description: synthetic red dye found in sweets, soft drinks, Turkish delight
  • Products: Fry’s Turkish Delight, Cadbury Mini Eggs, Maynards Wine Gums
  • Health effects: causes hyperactivity and may bring on allergic reactions.